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Law on Admissions and Confessions

Law on Admissions and Confessions

  • ₹1,595.00

In Stock
  • Author(s): C.D. Field
  • Publisher: Delhi Law House
  • Edition: 3 Ed 2017
  • ISBN 13 9789381308561
  • Approx. Pages 976 + Contents
  • Delivery Time Normally 7-9 working days

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Description
Eversince, the expression "confession and admission" were coined for evidentiary use, Courts have attempted to draw clear distinctions between them, and all too frequently, judicial opinions have mirrored slavish obedience to the authority of mechanical definitions. For the sake of clarity, a succint, well-put definition may serve a utilitarian purpose in establishing read comprehension of a segment of human experience, but, when detached from actual fact, and the many variables that fact situation produce, this same definition may stifle the imagination and inhibit appreciation of practical considerations.A confession may be defined as an out of Court statement by a suspect in which he or she committed or participated in the commission of a crime and which makes it clear that there is no defence in law that would make his or her conduct lawful.A confession must always related to the commission of an offence by a perpetrator either as a perpetrator,co-perpetrator, a socius criminis or an accessory thereof. A confession is an acknowledgment in express terms by a party in a criminal case of guilt. More so, a confession implies an admission of every essential element necessary to establish the crime with which the defendant is charged . An admission is something less. It is a statement of facts pertinent to the issue from which guilt may be inferred and which tends towards proof of the ultimate fact of guilt.
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Contents
Chapter I.   Introduction
Chapter II.  Definition of Admission
Chapter III. Admission by Party to Proceeding etc.
Chapter IV.  Admission by Persons Whose Posting Must be Proved as Against Party to Suit
Chapter V.   Admission by Persons Expressly Referred to by Party to Suit
Chapter VI.  Proof of Admissions Against Persons Making Them, And by or on Their Behalf
Chapter VII. Relevancy of Oral Admissions as to Contents of Documents and Electronic Records
Chapter VIII. Relevancy of Admission in Civil Cases
Part II : ON CONFESSIONS
             Confessions - General note.
Chapter IX.  Irrelevancy of Confession Caused by Inducement, Threat or Promise
Chapter X.   Non-Proving of Confession to Police Officer
Chapter XI.  Confession by Accused While in Custody of Police
Chapter XII. Proving of Information Received From Accused
Chapter XIII.Confession Made After Removal of Impression Caused by Inducement, Threat, etc.
Chapter XIV. Relevancy of Confession Due to Promise of Secrecy,etc.
Chapter XV.  Consideration of Proved Confession Affecting Person Making IT, etc.
Chapter XVI. Admissions Not as Conclusive Proof But as Estoppels
Chapter XVII.Guidelines on Extra-Judicial Confessions.
Subject Index
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