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Information Technology Law - The Law and Society

Information Technology Law - The Law and Society

  • ₹2,395.00

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Description
The second edition of this ground-breaking textbook systematically examines how the law and legal processes of the U K—developed to meet the needs of a traditional physical society—interact with the modern 'information society' and the fast-moving process of digitisation.
Updated to take account of new developments in both technology and law, Andrew Murray examines the challenges that this fast pace of change continues to bring to the established legal order.
To address these issues, the book begins by defining the information society and discussing how it may be regulated. From there it moves to questions of internet governance, along with rights and responsibilities in the digital environment. Particular attention is paid to key regulatory 'pressure points', including:
•    social network platforms
•    harmful and violent speech
•    intermediary liability
•    copyright for digital products
•    identity fraud
•    electronic commerce
•    privacy and surveillance
Information Technology Law: The law and society covers all aspects of a course of study on IT law, and is therefore ideal for students.The author's highly original and thought-provoking approach to the subject makes this text essential reading for researchers, IT professionals and policymakers.
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Contents
Part I Information And Society
1. The world of bits
    1.1  An introduction to bits
    1.2  Moving from atoms to bits
    1.3  Rivalrous and nonrivalrous goods
    1.4  The legal challenge of the information society
2. The network of networks
    2.1  Introducing the internet (history)
    2.2  How the modern internet functions
    2.3  Higher-level protocols
3. Digitisation and society
    3.1   The digitisation of information
    3.2   Digital convergence
    3.3   The cross-border challenge of information law
    3.4   Digitisation and law
Part II    Governance in The Information Society
4. Regulating the digital environment
    
4.1  Can we regulate the digital environment?
    4.2  Lawrence Lessig's modalities of regulation
    4.3  Network communitarianism
    4.4  Regulators in cyberspace: private regulators
    4.5  Regulators in cyberspace: states and supranational regulation
    4.6  Conclusions
5. Digital ownership
    5.1  Digital property
    5.2  Digital trespass
    5.3  Virtual property
    5.4  Conclusions
6. Cyber-speech
    6.1  Introduction
    6.2  From web 1.0 to web 2.0
    6.3  Freedom of expression and social responsibility
    6.4  Political speech
    6.5  Hate speech
    6.6  Commercial speech
    6.7  Conclusions: cyber-speech and free expression
7. Social networking and antisocial conduct
    7.1  Introduction
    7.2  Social networking, gossip and privacy
    7.3  Making criminal threats and organising criminal activity
    7.4  Cyberbullying, trolling and harassment
    7.5  YouTube and 'Innocence of Muslims'
    7.6  Conclusions
8. Defamation
    8.1  The tort of defamation
    8.2  Digital defamation: publication and republication
    8.3  Intermediary liability
    8.4  Digital defamation and UGC
    8.5  Conclusions
Part III   Digital Content and Intellectual Property Rights
9. Intellectual property rights and the information society
    9.1  An introduction to IPRs
    9.2  IPRs and digitisation
10. Software
     10.1  Protecting software: history
     10.2  Copyright in computer software
     10.3  Copyright infringement and software: literal copying
     10.4  Copyright infringement and software: non-literal copying
     10.5  Copyright infringement and software: permitted acts
     10.6  Software licences
     10.7  Patent protection for computer software
     10.8  Conclusions
11. Copyright in the digital environment
     11.1  Linking, caching and aggregating
     11.2  Peer-to-peer networks
     11.3  Information and the public domain: the creative commons
     11.4  Conclusions
12. Databases
     12.1  Copyright and the database right
     12.2  The database right
     12.3  Databases and the information society
     12.4  Conclusions
Part IV Criminal Activity in The Information Society
13. Computer misuse
     13.1  Hacking
     13.2  Viruses, criminal damage and mail-bombing
     13.3  Denial of service and supply of devices
14. Pornography and obscenity in the information society
     14.1  Obscenity
     14.2  Pornography
     14.3  Child-abuse images and pseudo images
     14.4  Extreme pornography
     14.5  Private regulation of pornographic imagery
     14.6  Conclusions
15. Crime and law enforcement in the information society
     15.1  Fraud and identity theft
     15.2  Grooming, harassment and cyberstalking
     15.3  Cyberterrorism
     15.4  Bandwidth theft
     15.5  The Convention on Cybercrime
     15.6  Conclusions
Part V    E-Commerce
16. Branding and trade marks in the information society
     16.1  Trade marks and branding
     16.2  Trade marks in the global business environment
     16.3  Domain names as badges of identity
     16.4  Early trade mark/domain name disputes
     16.5  The ICANN UDRP
     16.6  The Nominet DRS
     16.7  Brand identities, search engines and secondary markets
     16.8  Conclusions
17. Electronic contracts
     17.1  Contracting informally
     17.2  Regulating offer and acceptance
     17.3 Contractual terms
     17.4  Formal contracts
     17.5  Electronic signatures
     17.6  Conclusions
18. Electronic payments
     18.1  Electronic payments
     18.2  The Electronic Money Directive 2000
     18.3  Review of the Electronic Money Directive and the 2009 Electronic Money Directive
     18.4  Conclusions
Part VI   Privacy in The Information Society
19. Data protection
     19.1  Digitisation, personal data and the data industry
     19.2  Data Protection Act 1998: background and structure
     19.3  The Data Protection Act 1998
     19.4  The data protection principles, processing and fairness
     19.5  Conditions for processing of personal data
     19.6  Supervision of data controllers: data subject rights
     19.7  State supervision of data controllers
     19.8  Developments in data protection law
     19.9  Conclusions
20. Data and personal privacy
     20.1  Enhanced CCTV
     20.2  RFID tracking
     20.3  Location and data retention
     20.4  Conclusions
Part VII  Future Challenges for Information Law
21. The digital public sphere
     21.1  E-government
     21.2  The digital divide
     21.3  The democratic divide
     21.4  Conclusions
22. What way next?
     22.1  Future developments
     22.2  Web 3.0
     22.3  Law 2.0
Index
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Author Details
Andrew Murray is Professor of Law at the London School of Economics and Political Science.
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