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Cassesse' s International Criminal Law

Cassesse' s International Criminal Law

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Description
Cassese’s International Criminal Law provides a clear account of the main substantive and procedural aspects of International criminal law. Adopting a combination of the classic common law and more theoretical approaches to the subject, it discusses:
•  The historical evolution of international criminal law;
•  The legal definition of the so-called core crimes (war crimes, crimes against
   humanity, genocide) plus aggression, torture and terrorism;
•  The forms and modes of criminal responsibility; and
•  The main issues related to the prosecution and punishment of international crimes at the
    national and international level, including amnesties, statutes of limitations, and immunities.
The phases of international criminal proceedings are also covered, as well as the structure and functioning of all modern international criminal courts.
Written by one of the leading experts in the field, called 'a giant of international law' by the UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, the third edition benefits from Judge Cassese's academic expertise and practical experience. As one of his last pieces of academic work, the reader is privileged to be exposed to Cassese's unique perspective, which brings an inimitable dynamism to the subject.
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Contents
Part I  Introduction
1. Fundamentals Of International Criminal Law
   1.1  The Main Features of ICL
   1.2  Sources of ICL
   1.3  The Notion of International Crimes
2. The Principle Of Legality
    2.1  The Principle of Legality in Civil Law and in Common Law Countries
    2.2  The Principle of Legality in ICL
    2.3   Articulations of the Principle of Legality
    2.4  The Principle of Legality of Penalties
3. The Elements Of International Crimes, In Particular The Mental Element
    3.1  The Objective Structure
    3.2  The Mental Element
    3.3  Intent
    3.4  Special Intent (Dolus Specialis)
    3.5  Recklessness or Indirect Intent
    3.6  Knowledge
    3.7  Culpable or Gross Negligence
    3.8  The Mental Element in the ICC Statute
    3.9  Judicial Determination of the Mental Element
Part II Substantive Criminal Law
Section I International Crimes

4. War Crimes
    4.1  The Notion
    4.2  The Criminalization of the Serious Violation of a Rule of IHL
    4.3  The Objective Elements
    4.4 The Subjective Elements
    4.5 The Nexus with the Armed Conflict
    4.6 War Crimes in the ICC Statute
5. Crimes Against Humanity
    5.1  The Nuremberg Charter and Judgment
    5.2  Subsequent Developments
    5.3  The Notion Today
    5.4  The Objective Elements
    5.5  The Subjective Elements
    5.6  The Authors
    5.7  The Victims
    5.8  Article 7 of the ICC Statute and Customary International Law
6. Genocide (Revised By Paola Gaeta)
    6.1  The Genocide Convention
    6.2  Developments in the Case Law on Genocide
    6.3  The Objective Elements
    6.4  The Subjective Elements
    6.5  The Protected Groups
    6.6  Two Problematical Aspects of Genocide
    6.7  Genocide and Crimes against Humanity
    6.8  Article 6 of the ICC Statute and Customary International Law
7. Torture And Aggression (Revised By Mary Fan)
    7.1  Torture
    7.2  The Crime of Aggression
8. Terrorism
    8.1  The Freedom Fighters' Problem
    8.2  Elements Pointing to the Existence of a Generally Agreed Definition of Terrorism in Time of Peace
    8.3  The Ingredients of Terrorism as an International Crime in Time of Peace
    8.4  Specific Sub-categories of Terrorism as an International Crime
    8.5  Terrorism in Armed Conflict: A Sub-category of War Crimes
    8.6  Terrorism as a Crime against Humanity
Section II   Modes Of Criminal Liability
9. Perpetration: In Particular Joint And Indirect Perpetration (Revised By Laurel Baig)
    9.1  Joint Criminal Enterprise
    9.2  Co-perpetration Based on Joint Control
    9.3  Indirect Perpetration
10. Omission Liability And Superior Responsibility (Revised By Laurel Baig)
      10.1  Culpable Omission
      10.2  Superior Responsibility
      10.3  Is Superior Responsibility a Mode of Liability or a Crime per se?
11. Other Modes Of Criminal Liability And Inchoate Crimes (Revised By Laurel Baig)
     11.1  Aiding and Abetting
     11.2  Ordering
     11.3  Instigating
     11.4  Planning
     11.5  Residual Accessory Liability in the ICC Statute
     11.6  Inchoate Crimes
Section III Circumstances Excluding Criminal Liability
12. Justifications And Excuses (Revised By Christopher Gosnell)
     12.1  Justifications
     12.2  Excuses
13. Obedience To Superior Orders And Official Capacity
     (Revised By Christopher Gosnell And Paola Gaeta)
     13.1   Superior Orders
     13.2  The Irrelevance of Official Capacity
Part III  Prosecution And Punishment
Section I International And National Criminal Jurisdiction

14. International Criminal Courts
      14.1  Abortive Early Attempts (1919-1945)
      14.2  The Nuremberg and Tokyo Tribunals (1945-1947)
      14.3  The Establishment of the ICTY and ICTR (1993-1994)
      14.4  The Drafting and Adoption of the Statute of the ICC (1994-1998)
      14.5  The Establishment of Internationalized or Mixed Courts
      14.6  Merits and Flaws of International Criminal Justice
15. The Repression Of International Crimes In Domestic Jurisdictions (Revised By Paola Gaeta)
      15.1  International Law and the Ambit of States' Criminal Jurisdiction
      15.2  Principles of Criminal Jurisdiction
      15.3  International Rules on States' Criminal Jurisdiction over International Crimes
      15.4  An Unsatisfactory Regulation
16. International Versus National Jurisdiction (Revised By Alex Whiting)
      16.1  The Nuremberg Scheme Versus the ICC Scheme
      16.2  The Primacy of International Criminal Courts with Respect to National Jurisdictions
      16.3  The Complementarity of the ICC
      16.4  Judicial Cooperation of States with International Criminal Courts
17. Legal Impediments To The Exercise Of Criminal Jurisdiction
      17.1  Amnesty
      17.2  Statute of Limitations
      17.3  The Prohibition of Double Jeopardy
      17.4  International Rules on Immunities
Section II International Criminal Trials
18. The Adoption Of The Essential Features Of The Adversarial System
     (Revised By Christopher Gosnell)
      18.1  A Comparison of the Two Models in Operation
      18.2  Trial Proceedings
      18.3  Appellate Proceedings
      18.4  A Summary of the Main Distinguishing Features
      18.5  The Adoption of the Adversarial Model at the International Legal Level
      18.6  Towards a Felicitous Amalgamation of Procedural Elements
19. General Principles Governing International Criminal Trials (Revised By Christopher Gosnell)
      19.1  The Protection from Self-incrimination
      19.2  The Principle that Judges must be Independent and Impartial
      19.3  The Presumption of Innocence
      19.4  Communication of the Charges and Opportunity to Challenge Them
      19.5  Trial without Undue Delay
      19.6  A Public Hearing
      19.7  Fairness
      19.8  The Principle that the Accused Should Be Present at his Trial
20. Investigation And Trial Before International Criminal Courts (Revised By Christopher Gosnell)
     20.1  International Criminal Investigation
     20.2  The Initiation of Proceedings and Preparation for Trial
     20.3  Trial Proceedings
     20.4  The Role of Victims and Reparations
21. Appeals And Enforcement (Revised By Laurel Baig)
     21.1  Appeals
     21.2  Revision and Review
     21.3  Enforcement of Sentences
Index
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Author Details

The late Judge Antonio Cassese was President of the Special Tribunal for Lebanon. He was a Professor of International Law at Florence University and member of the Institut de Droit International. He was also President of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former-Yugoslavia.
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