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All England Law Reports - Consolidated Tables and Index 1936- 2009 (In 3 Vols)

All England Law Reports - Consolidated Tables and Index 1936- 2009 (In 3 Vols)

  • ₹9,995.00

In Stock
  • Brand: LexisNexis
  • Edition: Indian RP 2009
  • ISBN 13 9781405742894
  • Approx. Pages 4065 + Contents

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Description

The three volumes of the Consolidated Tables and Index constitute a complete and
systematicindex to all the cases reported in the All England Law Reports from theinception of the series in 1936 to the end of 2009.
•    Volume 1 contains a table of cases reported and a table of words and phrases judicially
     considered.
•    Volume2 contains a subject Index from A-H to enable the reader to obtain the names
     and references of a case on a particular topic.
•    Volume 3 contains a subject Index from I- Z to enable the reader to obtain the names
     and references of a case on a particular topic
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Contents
Volume I
Cases reported and considered
Practice directions and notes
Statutes considered
A-    Public general statutes
B-    Local, personal and private statutes
C-    Ecclesiastical measure
D-    Northern Ireland
E-    Scotland
F-    Commonwealth and other territories
Antigua
Australia
Bahamas
Barbados
Belize
Bermuda
British Virgin Islands
Brunei
Burma
Canada
Cylon
Cyprus
East Africa
Fiji
Chana
Gibraltar
Grenada
Guyana
Hong Kong
India
Isle of Man
Jamaica
Jersey
Kenya
Leeward Islands
Lesotho
Malaysia
Malta
Mauritius
New Zealand
Nigeria
Pakistan
Palestine
Rhodesia
St. Christopher, Nevis and Anguilla
St. Vincent and the Granadines
Singapore
Somaliland
South Africa
Swaziland
Trinidad and Tobago
West Africa
G-    Rule of the Supreme Court
H-    Country Court Rules
J-    Civil Procedure Rules 1998
J-    Matrimonial Causes Rules
K-   Bankruptcy and Insolvency Rules
L-    Other rules
M-    Regulations
N-    Orders
O-    Europeans Communities Legislation
P-    Miscellaneous
Words and phrases considere

Volume II
Subject Index A - H

The purposeof the subject index is to enable the reader to obtain the names and references of cases on a particular topic. The arrangement of the index follows the conventional pattern of legal indexes, being based on an alphabetical sequence of main headings each of which is sub divided into further sub-headings, also arranged in alphabetical sequence, covering topics which fall within the generality of the main heading. For every entry, other than cross-reference entries, the process of sub division has been taken two stages further. Thus each entry has been classified under a main index heading and three further sub-headings in descending order of generality. If superior headings have not already done so, the third level of sub-heading should identify with sufficient particularity the entries relevant to the particular topic on which the reader is seeking authority.
For example, a reader who is searching for cases on mistake as to the ownership of goods in relation to a charge of theft under the modern laws hould refer to the general heading 'CRIMINAL LAW. He will there findover 2,300 entries listedunder thatheading. Almost all of those caseswill clearly be irrelevant to the point on which the reader is seeking authority. The next step,therefore, is to turn to the sub-heading 'Theft' under the general heading 'CRIMINAL LAW. He will there find some72 entries listed under that sub-heading. The search may however be taken two stages further byturning to the sub-sub-heading 'Property belonging to another', whichcovers 18 entries, and the further sub-heading 'Mistake' under the sub-sub-heading 'Propertybelonging to another' which will reveal two entries expressly on thetopic on which authority is being sought.
The different levels of heading and sub-heading are indicated typographically thus:
CRIMINAL LAW
Theft-
Property belonging to another—
Mistake—
The main heading and first two levels of sub-headings are not repeated forevery entry towhich they relate but only for the first relevant entry and, for convenience,at the top of each new page, followed by '(cont)—'to indicate the continuation.
It willnot usually be necessaryto proceed to the third level of sub-heading to identifyrelevant caseswith sufficient particularity. Thus, a reference tothesub-headingTreason' under the main heading 'CRIMINAL LAW willreveal thatthere isonly one case on that topic.
Inmostcases main entries, ieentries other than cross-reference entries,do notconclude with thethird level of sub-heading but continue withsufficient'catchphrases' toindicate the salient facts of the casereferred to and/or thepoint oflaw on which the case is authority. Mainentries conclude with thenameof the case which is being referred toand its citation.
Insearchingfor entries on a particulartopic, the reader will not always choosethesame words or phrase, orstart with the same generality of heading, asthatused in the index.For this reason the index has been fullycross-referenced.Thus, areader searching for cases on theft who looksup the mainheading'THEFT' will find a cross-reference stating:'Generally. SeeCriminal law(Theft)', indicating that he should refer tothesub-heading Theft' under themain heading 'CRIMINAL LAW.
Cross-referenceentriesfallinto two categories: (i) cross-references from one mainheadingtoanother main heading (external cross-references) and(ii)cross-referenceswithin the limits of a particular mainheading(internal cross-references). Allcross-references of eithervarietybegin with the word 'See'in italic type.
(i)   lnexternalcross-references the word 'See'is followed by a word orphrase inboldtype followed, where appropriate, by further words orphrases withinbrackets.The word or phrase in bold type denotes themain heading whichis beingreferred to and the words in brackets thesub-headings underthat main headingto which reference should be madein order to locatethe entries on the topicin question. The followingare examples: 'SeeAuctioneer' means that the readershould refer to allthe entries underthe heading 'AUCTIONEER'; 'See Landlordand tenant(Forfeiture oflease—Arrears of rent)' means that the readershouldrefer to thesub-sub-heading 'Arrears of rent' under thesub-heading'Forfeiture oflease' under the main heading 'LANDLORD ANDTENANT'.
(ii)    Ininternalcross-references there are no words inbold type or in brackets.Theword 'See'is followed bywords or phrases inordinary Roman typewhich are inturn followed by the word  'above'or'below'in italic type. These indicate the sub-heading and,whereappropriate,further sub-headings which appear under the samemainheading as thecross-reference itself. Thus under the mainheading'ARREST' there is asub-heading 'Constable' followed byasub-sub-heading 'Arrest without warrant'.This is followed bythecross-reference 'See Arrest without warrant—Constable,above'.Thisindicates that to locate the relevant entries, the readershouldreferto the sub-sub-heading 'Constable' under the sub-heading'Arrestwithoutwarrant' under the same main heading 'ARREST'.Internalcross-references alwaysstart with the principal sub-headingunder therelevant main heading,   even though  the  cross-reference  entry itself  may  also appear  under  that sub-heading. Thus following the entry:
COSTS
Taxation—
Solicitor—
Valueadded tax
thereisacross-reference'See Taxation—Value added tax, below'. This referstotheentry under thesub-sub-heading 'Value added tax' under thesameprincipalsub-heading'Taxation'.

Volume III
Contents
Subject Index I - Z


The purpose of the subject index is to enable the reader to obtain the names and references of cases on a particular topic. The arrangement of the index follows the conventional pattern of legal indexes, being based on an alphabetical sequence of main headings each of which is subdivided into further sub-headings, also arranged in alphabetical sequence, covering topics which fall within the generality of the main heading. For every entry, other than cross-reference entries, the process of subdivision has been taken two stages further. Thus each entry has been classified under a main index heading and three further sub-headings in descending order of generality. If superior headings have not already done so, the third level of sub-heading should identify with sufficient particularity the entries relevant to the particular topic on which the reader is seeking authority.
For example, a reader who is searching for cases on the duty of disclosure under a contract of marine insurance should refer to the general heading'MARINE INSURANCE'. He will there find over 150 entries listed under that heading. Almost all of those cases will clearly be irrelevant to the point on which the reader is seeking authority. The next step, therefore, is to turn to the sub-heading 'Contract of marine insurance' under the general heading 'MARINE INSURANCE'. He will there find three entries listed under that subheading. The search may however be taken two stages further by turning to the sub-sub-heading 'Disclosure', which covers one entry, and the further sub-heading 'Duty to disclose' which will reveal four entries expressly on the topic on which authority is being sought.
The different levels of heading and sub-heading are indicated typographically thus: MARINE INSURANCE
Contract of marine insurance— Disclosure— Duty to disclose—
The main heading and first two levels of sub-headings are not repeated for every entry to which they relate but only for the first relevant entry and, for convenience, at the top of each new page, followed by '(cont)—' to indicate the continuation.
It will not usually be necessary to proceed to the third level of sub-heading to identify relevant cases with sufficient particularity. Thus, a reference to the sub-heading 'Deviation' under the main heading 'MARINE INSURANCE'will reveal that there is only one case on that topic.
In most cases main entries, ie entries other than cross-reference entries, do not conclude with the third level of sub-heading but continue with sufficient'catchphrases'to indicate the salient facts of the case referred to and/or the point of law on which the case is authority. Main entries conclude with the name of the case which is being referred to and its citation.
In searching for entries on a particular topic, the reader will not always choose the same words or phrase, or start with the same generality of heading, as that used in the index. For this reason the index has been fully cross-referenced. Thus, a reader searching for cases on mutual wills who looks up the main heading 'MUTUAL WILLS' will find a cross-reference stating: 'Generally. See Will (Mutual Wills)', indicating that he should refer to the sub-heading 'Mutual Wills' under the main heading 'WILL'. Cross-reference entries fall into two categories: (i) cross-references from one main heading to another main heading (external cross-references) and (ii) cross-references within the limits of a particular main heading (internal cross-references). All cross-references of either variety begin with the word 'See' in italic type.
(i)     In external cross-references the word 'See'is followed by a word or phrase in bold type followed, where appropriate, by further words or phrases within brackets. The word or phrase in bold type denotes the.main heading which is being referred to and the words in brackets the sub-headings under that main heading to which reference should be made in order to locate the entries on the topic in question. The following are examples: 'See Auctioneer' means that the reader should refer to all the entries under the heading 'AUCTIONEER'; 'See Landlord and tenant (Forfeiture of lease—Arrears of rent)' means that the reader should refer to the sub-sub-heading 'Arrears of rent' under the sub-heading 'Forfeiture of lease' under the main heading 'LANDLORD AND TENANT'.

(ii)     In internal cross-references there are no words in bold type or in brackets. The word 'See'is followed by words or phrases in ordinary Roman type which are in turn followed by the word 'above' or 'below' in italic type. These indicate the sub-heading and, where appropriate, further sub-headings which appear under the same main heading as the cross-reference itself. Thus under the main heading 'PATENT' there is a sub-heading 'Certiorari' followed by a sub-sub-heading 'Patent appeal tribunal'. This is followed by the cross-reference 'See Appeal Tribunal—Certiorari to quash decision of tribunal, above'. This indicates that to locate the relevant entries, the reader should refer to the sub-sub-heading 'Certiorari to quash decision of tribunal' under the sub-heading 'Appeal Tribunal' under the same main heading 'PATENT. Internal cross-references always start with the principal sub-heading under the relevant main heading, even though the cross-reference entry itself may also appear under that sub-heading. Thus following the entry:
ROAD TRAFFIC
Breath test—
Suspicion of alcohol
there is a cross-reference 'See Breath test—Person driving or attempting to drive— Suspicion of alcohol, above'. This refers to the entry under the sub-sub-heading 'Person driving or attempting to drive' under the same principal sub-heading 'Breath test'.

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