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Administrative Law Text and Materials

Administrative Law Text and Materials

  • ₹3,431.00

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Description

Administrative Law : Text and Materials combines carefully selected extracts key cases, articles , and other sources with detailed commentary and explanation.
Rather than simply presenting administrative law as a straightforward body of legal rules, this engaging, critical text considers the subject as an expression of underlying constitutional and other policy concerns, which fundamentally shape the relationship between the citizen and the state. The result is a fascinating account of a subject of crucial importance and an essential text for undergraduates studying Administrative Law.
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Contents
1.    Introductory Matters
       1.1 - Administrative Law
       1.2 - How is Good Administration to be secured?
       1.3 - The Changing Face of Judicial Review
       1.4 - The Constitutional Basis of Judicial Review
       1.5 - Administrative Power in the Modern Constitution
       1.6 - Concluding Remarks
       Further Resources
2.    Jurisdiction
       2.1 - Introduction
       2.2 - Errors of Law
       2.3 - Applying Statutory Criteria to the Facts
       2.4 - Supervision of the Fact-Finding Process
       2.5 - Subjective Jurisdictional Criteria
       2.6 - Non-Compliance with Statutory Requirements
       2.7 - Concluding Remarks
       Further Resources
3.    The Status of Unlawful Administrative Action
       3.1 - Void or Voidable?
       3.2 - The Nature of Voidness
       3.3 - Managing the Practical Effects of Voidness
       3.4 - Collateral Challenge
       3.5 - Concluding Remarks
       Further Resources
4.    The Scope of Public Law Principles
       4.1 - Introduction
       4.2 - Statutory Powers
       4.3 - Prerogative 'Powers
       4.4 - De Facto Powers
       4.5 - Section 6 of the Human Rights Act 1998
       4.6 - Concluding Remarks
       Further Resources
5.    Retention of Discretion
       5.1 - Introduction
       5.2 - Delegation of Discretionary Power
       5.3 - Discretion and Policy
       5.4 - Discretionary Power and Contractual Arrangements
       5.5 - Concluding Remarks Further Resources
6.    Legitimate Expectations
       6.1 - Lawfully Created Expectations
       6.2 - Unlawfully Created Expectations
       6.3 - Concluding Remarks Further Resources
7.    Abuse of Discretion I
       7.1 - Introduction
       7.2 - Loyalty to the Statutory Scheme: The Propriety of Purpose Doctrine
       7.3 - Inputs into the Decision-Making Process: The Relevancy Doctrine
       7.4 - Concluding Remarks Further Resources
8.    Abuse of Discretion II
       8.1 - Introduction
       8.2 - Reasonableness and Rationality
       8.3 - Proportionality as a Principle of Review
       8.4 - Concluding Remarks Further Resources
9.   Bias, Impartiality, and Independence
       9.1 - The Rule: Its Scope and Rationale
       9.2 - Automatic Disqualification
       9.3 - The Apprehension of Bias
       9.4 - Bias, Policy, and Politics
       9.5 - Article 6
       9.6 - Concluding Remarks
       Further Resources
10.  Procedural Fairness
       10.1 - The idea of procedural fairness
       10.2 - When must decision-makers act fairly?
       10.3 - What is the content of the duty to act fairly?
       10.4 - Consultation
       10.5 - Concluding remarks
11.  Giving Reasons for Decisions
       11.1 - Introductory matters
       11.2 - Why require reason
       11.3 - The duty to give reasons at common law
       11.4 - Statutory and other duties to give reasons
       11.5 - Discharging a duty to give reasons
       11.6 - Remedial consequences
       11.7 - Concluding remarks
       Further Resources
12.  Remedies
       12.1 - Introduction
       12.2 - Injunctions
       12.3 - Declarations
       12.4 - Relator Proceedings
       12.5 - Prerogative Remedies
       13.6 - Concluding Remarks
        Further Resources
13.  The Judicial Review Procedure
       13.1 - Introduction
       13.2 - What is the Judicial Review Procedure?
       13.3 - When Must the Judicial Review Procedure be Used?   
       13.4 - Concluding Remarks 
14.  Restriction of Remedies
       14.1 - Introduction
       14.2 - Permission
       14.3 - Exhaustion of Alternative Remedies
       14.4 - Time Limits
       14.5 - Prematurity and Ripeness
       14.6 - Exclusion of Judicial Review
       14.7 - Standing
       14.8 - Concluding Remarks
       Further Resources
15.  Liability of Public Authorities 
       15.1 - Introduction
       15.2 - Relationship with judicial review
       15.3 - The Law of Torts
       15.4 - Damages under the Human Rights Act 1998
       15.5 - State liability in EU law
       15.6 - Contract
       15.7 - Restitution
        Further Resources
16.  Delegated Legislation
       16.1 - General matters
       16.2 - The Making of Delegated Legislation
       16.3 - Parliamentary Scrutiny
       16.4 - Judicial Scrutiny
       16.5 - Concluding Remarks Further Resources
17.  Inquiries
       17.1 - Two types of inquiries
       17.2 - Ex ante inquiries
       17.3 - Ex post inquiries
       17.4 - Conducting remarks
                  Further Resources
18.  Statutory Tribunals
       18.1 - Introduction
       18.2 - The Independence of Tribunals
       18.3 - Procedure in Tribunals
       18.4 - Appeals and the System of Tribunals
       18.5 - The Supervision and Accountability of Tribunals
       18.6 - Concluding Remarks
       Further Resources
20.  Ombudsmen
       19.1 - Introduction
       19.2 - Bodies Subject to Investigation
       19.3 - Matters Subject to Investigation
       19.4 - The Conduct of Investigations
       19.5 - Problems and Reform
       19.6 - Concluding Remarks
       Further Resources
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About the Author
Dr. Mark Elliott
is a Lecturer in Law and Assistant Director of the Centre for Public Law
at the University of Cambridge. He is also a Fellow of St Catharine's College, Cambridge.
Sir Jack Beatson FBA, formerly Rouse Ball Professor of English Law at the
University of Cambridge, is a Justice of the High Court, Queen's Bench Division.
Martin Matthews is a Fellow and Praelector in Jurisprudence at University College,
Oxford and a C.U.F. Lecturer in Law at the University of Oxford.
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